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Principles and Practices of the Pastoral Ministry

Principles and Practices of the Pastoral Ministry

The apostle Peter read no books or journal articles on pastoral leadership.  He attended no seminars and heard no tapes.  However, with the wisdom of long years of experience, Peter distilled the essence of pastoral leadership into two simple admonitions: be humble, and do the work of shepherding the flock.  He expressed these foundational principles in 1 Peter. 5:1-3:

Therefore, I exhort the elders among you, as your fellow elder and witness of the sufferings of Christ, and a partaker also of the glory that is to be revealed, shepherd the flock of God among you, exercising oversight not under compulsion, but voluntarily, according to the will of God; and not for sordid gain, but with eagerness; nor yet as lording it over those allotted to your charge, but proving to be examples to the flock.

Peter modelled the humility he enjoined for pastors.  Although the acknowledged leader of the twelve apostles, he humbly described himself as “your fellow elder.”  He refused to lord his exalted position over the other elders.  And in verse 2 he gave the pastor’s calling, to “shepherd the flock of God” entrusted to his care.  Humble shepherds are what God requires to lead His flock.

 

Principles and practices of pastoral Ministry can be used as a stand-alone subject in recognised study programs and also to address the issues raised in the Accredited unit "NAT11239007 Provide guidance on ethical issues in a Christian ministry context".   This unit focuses on developing the skills and knowledge needed to analyze ethical issues and apply advanced theological understanding in a Christian setting. Through critical analysis, students will learn to guide ethical matters to others. This unit is specifically designed for leaders in Christian organizations who are responsible for analyzing and guiding others on ethical issues as part of their work.

Can what a pastor is to be and do be boiled down to a few basic principles?

The apostle Peter read no books or journal articles on pastoral leadership.  He attended no seminars and heard no tapes.  However, with the wisdom of long years of experience, Peter distilled the essence of pastoral leadership into two simple admonitions: be humble, and do the work of shepherding the flock.  He expressed these foundational principles in 1 Peter. 5:1-3:

Therefore, I exhort the elders among you, as your fellow elder and witness of the sufferings of Christ, and a partaker also of the glory that is to be revealed, shepherd the flock of God among you, exercising oversight not under compulsion, but voluntarily, according to the will of God; and not for sordid gain, but with eagerness; nor yet as lording it over those allotted to your charge, but proving to be examples to the flock.

Peter modelled the humility he enjoined for pastors.  Although the acknowledged leader of the twelve apostles, he humbly described himself as “your fellow elder.”  He refused to lord his exalted position over the other elders.  And in verse 2 he gave the pastor’s calling, to “shepherd the flock of God” entrusted to his care.  Humble shepherds are what God requires to lead His flock.

Course Description:

This exciting unit offers students the opportunity to delve into the fascinating world of ethical issues within a Christian setting. Through in-depth analysis and advanced theological understanding, students will gain the skills and knowledge needed to navigate complex ethical dilemmas. Designed for aspiring leaders in Christian organizations, this unit will empower students to critically examine ethical matters and provide insightful guidance to others.

Key Learning Outcomes:

Develop a deep understanding of ethical issues relevant to Christian organizations,  Apply critical thinking skills to analyze and evaluate ethical quandaries, Gain confidence in providing ethical guidance to others within a Christian context

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is ideal for students passionate about making a difference in Christian organizations and communities. Whether you aspire to be a leader in a church, ministry, or non-profit organization, this unit will equip you with the essential skills to navigate ethical challenges and provide valuable guidance to others.

Why Choose This Unit?

  • Engaging and thought-provoking exploration of ethical dilemmas in a Christian setting
  • Practical application of advanced theological understanding to real-world scenarios
  • Opportunities for personal growth and enhanced decision-making skills
  • Networking with like-minded individuals passionate about ethical leadership within Christian organizations

Prerequisites and Assessment:

There are no specific prerequisites for this unit.

Assessment will be based on a multiple choice open book questionnaire and a student study guide

 

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